Who’s the 2014 Aarhus hotwings champ?

On Saturday it’s the day for the annual hotwings eating contest in Aarhus - and you can still sign up to participate! As something new, we also have a hotdog competition this year.

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Last year’s 218 centimeters and 147 kilos winner is unfortunately unable to defend his crown as he’s playing pro basketball in Hamburg on Saturday, so the title is up for grabs. This year we have a twist for the hotwings, as the wings will get progressively hotter for each batch the contestants receive… it’s going to get HOOOT!

Go here to read the rules and sign up for the hotwings competition.

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What’s in a bøfsandwich?

The gravy burger or bøfsandwich as it’s called in it’s native habitat, Denmark, is one of the few original viking fast foods. OK, well, maybe the vikings didn’t eat these - but that hasn’t stopped the descendants for sure!

While it originates from the Copenhagen area, it’s in the Western parts of Denmark - Jylland - where it was perfected with gravy the late 1950s and is still served like that in this region. The gravy is starting to catch on and is slowly moving East with more and more restaurants seeing the brown light, so to speak.

A standard issue bøfsandwich will contain these condiments:

  • Buns - typically light wheat ones.
  • Patty made from freshly ground beef, preferably seared to get the maillard effect - and then left to soak in the gravy a little while, served with a nice pink interior.
  • Dressed with a brown pungent mustard, although rarely a dijon kind
  • Ketchup
  • Remoulade sauce - a version with lots of relish, some cayenne pepper, coriander, onion, and turmeric - so it’s a nice balanced sweet’n’sour taste
  • Pickled beets
  • Sliced dill pickles
  • A triad of onions: Raw, crispy roasted (often avaliable in Asian supermarkets), and soft grilled onions.
  • The gravy. There’s a thousand ways to make gravy, but using beef, pork or even duck stock as the base often gives you great results.

It’s a regional preference whether to douse the gravy over or underneath the top bun, but arguably the bread is there to soak up as much gravy as possible why putting it over the top (pun intended), is a bonafide solution.

Look at this naughty beast! Trust me - it’s divine.

The King of Denmark has finally been crowned

The burger King, that is. Earlier this week I posted the delicious picture of the new burger at Memphis Roadhouse and wrote it would only take a few tweaks to truly make this the best burger in all of Denmark. 
Well lo and behold - Chris and the guys listened to my feedback, employing a few tricks inspired by the Bossman of Hodad’s in San Diego and it certainly took this burger to the next level. 
A few highlights are the facts that most burger joints wrongly builds their burgers upside down, placing the beef patty close to the heel (bottom) bun. Why is this wrong? Let me quote the Bossman here:
The juices aren’t going to go up. You want that burger juice to go down through the lettuce, onions, pickles and tomatoes, and marinate the whole burger.
In the other words, let gravity - assisted by wrapping it tightly in a burger diaper - make your burger better as the juices of the beef, the produce, and the sauces marinate and give you a first-hand experience of synergy: This burger is greater than sum of its parts.

Now we just need to teach Danes not to eat their burgers with a fork and a knife (yes, that is the standard around here!), but use their built-in utensils: Hands! And remember, once you pick it up, don’t let it go - that’s when things get messy.
Anyway, the most important message here is: This is my first non-gravy 5 out of 5 burger experience in Denmark - in other words: If you want the best damn burger in Denmark, go to Memphis Roadhouse in Aarhus: ALL HAIL THE KING!

This is ‘biksemad’ another Danish classic. It’s basically pan-fried leftovers - meat and potatoes - served with a sunny egg and pickled beets.

In the second picture you see how a Danish snaps (aquavit) should be poured.

Absolutely divine evening and the food and service is always ace at Raadhuuskaféen in Aarhus.

Back at one of my favourite Aarhus restaurants, Memphis Roadhouse, which recently added a burger to the menu - so naturally I had to try that.
First of all: This burger was cooked perfectly - pinkish and juicy as hell, which oddly is a rarity in Denmark. The rest of the burger was nice, but aside from the fantastic homemade pickles it was quite a generic experience, although good quality all the way.
This burger rivals MASH for the title for the best burger in Aarhus, but I have the feeling that this burger could snatch the title and a 5 out of 5 rating with a few twists. Time will tell…

Back at one of my favourite Aarhus restaurants, Memphis Roadhouse, which recently added a burger to the menu - so naturally I had to try that.

First of all: This burger was cooked perfectly - pinkish and juicy as hell, which oddly is a rarity in Denmark. The rest of the burger was nice, but aside from the fantastic homemade pickles it was quite a generic experience, although good quality all the way.

This burger rivals MASH for the title for the best burger in Aarhus, but I have the feeling that this burger could snatch the title and a 5 out of 5 rating with a few twists. Time will tell…

Going for a hotdog in Tokyo was an interesting experience, as the very kind staff didn’t speak English, rendering my ordering to pointing to a picture - a bit of an experiment, really!

I did pick up that she said ‘miso’ referring to my dog, however it didn’t taste particularly miso-like to me - more like a somewhat bland Italian-inspired red sauce. The seaweed under the sausage didn’t really come through either, so it was a bit of a letdown, trying to taste something crazy.

The pork sausage was good though, so all in all a middle of the road 3 out 5 grade. Surprisingly Japadog in New York was a way more Japanese hotdog experience to me, but I’m certain Tokyo has better and more interesting dogs to offer - the search continues!